Menu
Home Page

15.06.20

The activities from the Collins Busy Ant 5c Pupil Book this week focus on multiplication.

 

Monday 15th June:

 Task 1: Spend 5-10 minutes practising your times tables on TTRockStars. Let's keep up our (unofficial) title of reigning champion year group.

 Task 2: Multiplication HTO x TO using partitioning (pages 76 and 77)

  • Must: complete Challenge 1 (if you find this a little tricky, you may begin with the support
    sheet which is attached below). Here are two videos which explain how to multiply by multiples of 10, 100 and 1000 as a reminder:
    Multiply by a multiple of 10
    Multiply a multiple of 100 by a multiple of 10
  • Should: complete Challenge 1 and Challenge 2. Use the example in the book to show you the method. You can use the formal column method for multiplication (TO x O and HTO x O) and the skills you've practised in Challenge 1 to help you.
  • Could: complete Challenge 1, Challenge 2 and Challenge 3.

 

Tuesday 16th June:

 Task 1: Choose and play a game from the 'Play' section on Mathletics.

 Task 2: Multiplication HTO x TO using partitioning and the grid method (pages 78 and 79)

There is also an extension task available to download below – scroll to the bottom of this page to download it.

 

Wednesday 17th June:

  Task 1: Spend 5-10 minutes practising your times tables on TTRockStars. Let's keep up our (unofficial) title of reigning champion year group.

  Task 2: Primes and squares investigation.

Download the prime and squares investigation sheet, read the instructions and carry out you investigation. Let us know what you find out. Before you get started, here are some important reminders:

  • Prime numbers are those that have only 2 factors: 1 and itself. You should be able to remember all the prime numbers up to 20, but in case you don't, here they are: 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17,  19. Each of these numbers has only 2 factors (they only appear in their own times table, and the 1 times table). For example: the factors of 11 are only 1 and 11, but 9 has 3 factors which are 1, 9 and 3 so it is not prime. 
  • Square numbers always have an odd number of factors (if a number isn't square, it will always have an even number of factors). This is because square numbers are created when you times a number by itself. For example: 4 x 4 = 16, so 16 is a square number. This means also that 16 will have an odd number of factors (1, 16, 2, 8, 4 - 5 factors). 
    The reason they are called 'square' numbers is because when you create an array to represent them, they create a square (rather than a rectangle).

                              

 

Thursday 18th June:

 Task 1: Choose and play a game from the 'Play' section on Mathletics.

 Task 2: Multiplication HTO x TO using the expanded written method (pages 80 and 81)

There is also an extension task available to download below – scroll to the bottom of this page to download it.

 

Friday 19th June:

 Task 1: Spend 5-10 minutes practising your times tables on TTRockStars. Let's keep up our (unofficial) title of reigning champion year group.

 Task 2: Solving word problems (pages 82 and 83)

  • Must: complete Challenge 1.
  • Should: complete Challenge 1 and Challenge 2.
  • Could: complete Challenge 1, Challenge 2 and Challenge 3.
Top