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15.06.20

Monday 15th June:

 Task 1: 10 minutes (minimum) of independent or shared reading, followed by a reading response activity from the reading journals hand out (available below).

 Task 2: Film narrative - forming opinions using evidence from film

✎ Watch the short film 'The Piano' by Aidan Gibbons by clicking here.

✎ Think about the following questions and make sure you are specific in your answers:

  • What did you like about the film? Why?
  • What did you dislike about the film? Why?
  • What puzzled you or made you ask questions about the film?
  • What patterns did you spot in the film?

✎ Complete the puzzles grid, filling in your likes, dislikes, puzzles and patterns.

✎ What questions does the film leave unanswered?

 Task 3: Spelling: Statutory Spelling Lists and Activities

All activities from the Nelson Spelling Pupil Book should now have been completed since you started in Year 5. You should now primarily focus on ensuring that you can spell as many of the words from the Year 5 / 6 Statutory Spelling list as you can.

Remember, the best way to practise spelling is by taking a 'little and often' approach. 5-10 minutes every day is better than one 1-hour long session each week. It is important to practise the same words repeatedly in order to make them 'stick'.

 

Tuesday 16th June:

 Task 1: 10 minutes (minimum) of independent or shared reading, followed by a reading response activity from the reading journals hand out (available below).

 Task 2: Film narrative - using textual evidence from a film to support and justify responses

✎ Re-watch the short film 'The Piano' by Aidan Gibbons by clicking here.

✎ How would you describe the mood or atmosphere of the film? Here are some words to get you started:

 

✎ Write a paragraph to describe the mood or atmosphere of the film. For each word you gave, give reasons and examples as to why you would describe the film in that way.

✎ Extension: Create a picture that shows that mood - think about how colour, texture and shapes can show that mood or create that atmosphere. They can be as abstract as you like, as long as they make the viewer see the mood you have chosen. You can use pens, pencils, paint, collage, or anything else you can get your hands on.

 

Thursday 18th June:

 Task 1: 10 minutes (minimum) of independent or shared reading, followed by a reading response activity from the reading journals hand out (available below).

 Task 2: Film narrative - using freeze frames to explore thoughts and feelings at key moments

✎ Re-watch the short film 'The Piano' by Aidan Gibbons by clicking here. Watching this for a third time, you should really be getting familiar with the scenes, and be able to focus on more of the details.

✎ What are the key moments of the film? Choose 3 - 5 moments that you think are the most important. For each of the key moments you have chosen, think about the following questions:

  • What might the character be saying at this point?
  • What might they be thinking?
  • How are they feeling?

✎ Draw pictures of the freeze frames you have chosen in the style of a story board or comic strip. Using speech or thought bubbles, write down what the character might be saying or thinking. (Alternatively, you can download the freeze frame worksheet below.)

  • Must: Choose three key moments from the film and talk about what the character might be saying or thinking or both.
  • Should: As above, and cut our or draw the key moments, using speech or thought bubbles to show what the character might be saying or thinking or both.
  • Could: As above, and write a sentence for each of the freeze frames you chose, explaining the gestures, body language or facial features that show that the character is feeling a certain way.

 

Friday 19th June:

 Task 1: 10 minutes (minimum) of independent or shared reading, followed by a reading response activity from the reading journals hand out (available below).

 Task 2: Film narrative - writing in a role

✎ Refer back to your puzzle grid from Monday's lesson. Do these things still puzzle you? What new puzzles do you have?

✎ Write down some questions that you would want to ask the main character in the film. For example:

  • What is your name?
  • Where did you grow up?
  • How old are you?
  • Do you have children?
  • Where is your wife?
  • Who taught you how to play the piano?
  • Which war did you fight in?
  • Who was the person who died?
  • How do you feel about your life?
  • What is your life like now?
  • If you could go back in time, would you change anything and, if so, what would you change? 

✎ Ask an adult to present to be the main character in the film. Hot seat them by asking them your questions and make notes about what they say.

✎ Use the information you have collected to write an autobiography as though you are the main character.

  • Must: Write in the first person the character's life and background (remember, you are the main character now).
  • Should: As above, and include references to your feelings at various points. 
  • Could: As above, and include references to your thoughts at various points.
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